Procedures:Lasik Statistics

Lasik Statistics

Success Rates

Line 5 on the eye chart to your left (20/40) is the line you need to read in order to legally drive without corrective lenses


Line 8 is the familiar 20/20 line. Note that it is possible (Line 9 = 20/15) to see better than 20/20. We have grouped lines 7,8, and 9 together in our results, because this zone represents a vision level that is typically described as "excellant" by even the most discriminating of our patients.
Visual Acuity without Glasses After Treatment
WaveLight WFO Statistics on patients with up to -8 D Myopia and up to -3 D Astigmatism
1 Month
257 patients
3 Month
221 Patients
1 Year
0 Patients
20/15 or better
47.9%
20/15 or better
57.9%
20/15 or better
NA%
20/20 or better
87.5%
20/20 or better
91.9%
20/20 or better
NA%
20/40 or better
98.4%
20/40 or better
99.5%
20/40 or better
NA%
WaveLight CONTOURA Statistics on patients with -8D Myopia and up to -3 D Astigmatism
1 Month
23 patients
3 Month
21 Patients
1 Year
NA patients
20/15 or better
65.2%
20/15 or better
66.7%

20/15 or better
NA%
20/20 or better
100%
20/20 or better
100%
20/20 or better
NA%
20/40 or better
100%
20/40 or better
100%
20/40 or better
NA%

Laser complications:
This includes decentrations of the laser treatment, central island formation, or seriously irregular ablation patterns. Mild degrees cause little trouble, but more serious situations require sophisticated retreatment procedures. Laser complications are less common with modern, top-of-the-line lasers such as the VISX Star S4.

- Reported incidence: 1.2% (myopia)1
- Hale Vision Correction 2001: < 0.002%
- Hale Vision Center 2011: no reported cases since commencing Eye Tracking 2001 and CustomVue Treatments in 2002.
Inflammation(DLK,SOS):
Inflammation is a normal reaction in any surgery, and the postoperative medications typically handle this response very easily. However, if this reaction is exaggerated, it can require more extensive therapy and rarely can affect the visual outcome.
Diffuse Lamellar Keratitis (DLK), which has also been termed the "Sands of the Sahara" (SOS), due to its sandy appearance under the microscope, refers to inflammation underneath a flap. As such, it is only found after LASIK.

- Reported incidence: 1% non-severe, 0.02% severe (2-4)
- Hale Vision Correction: 0.02% all mild
- Hale Vision Center 2003-2010 (2nd-4th generation Intralase) 0.5% all mild
- Hale Vision Center 2011 (5th generation Intralase) 0.0%
Overcorrection:
It is possible for the eye to over-respond to the calculated laser treatment. Mild cases are typically visually insignificant. However, significant overcorrection can be bothersome and require a retreatment procedure to correct the situation.

- Reported incidence: 1% (5-7)
- Hale Vision Correction: 0.57%
- Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011(Intralase period) 0.027%
Keratome/Flap Complications:
Creation of the corneal flap in LASIK is a crucial element in the overall process. Flap complications can include small flaps, irregularly shaped flaps, very thin flaps, button-hole flaps and an irregular treatment surface. If the abnormality is serious enough, the case must be cancelled without performing the laser treatment. After a 3-6 month healing period, a satisfactory flap can usually be created in a second attempt.

- Reported incidence: 0.7-11.8% (5,6,8,9)
- Hale Vision Correction: 0.18% over 8600 cases
- Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011 0.025% (Intralase period)
2 aborted flaps (eye too small, etc., flap not even fully attempted (both eyes treated with surface laser with good result)
Epithelial Ingrowth:
This is a condition in which the surface epithelial cells manage to migrate beneath the edge of the LASIK flap and invade the area known as the "interface". This is rare on primary cases and most commonly associated with retreatment procedures or traumatic dislocation of the flap. Mild cases are of no significance, but more aggressive intrusions can cause discomfort, a decrease in vision or threaten the health of the flap itself. In these more serious cases, it may be necessary to re-lift the flap and remove the cells. This is usually very successful and has no serious visual consequences.

- Reported incidence: 0.6-14.7% (4, 10)
- Hale Vision Correction: 0.55%
Incidence of Epithelial Ingrowth rises dramatically (25-35%) 2-3 years after original bladed keratome flap creation. Blade flaps are typically no longer lifted after 2-3years. Intralase flaps are much more resistant to Ingrowth due to laser edge construction but heal so well that flap lifts are rarely attempted, or necessary, after one year.
- Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011 (Intralase period) 0.038%
Infection:
One of the serious complications of any surgical procedure is infection. This can lead to serious loss of vision.

- Reported incidence: < 0.1%
- Hale Vision Correction: 0% in 8600 cases
- Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011 (Intralase period) 0%
Corneal Distortion or Thinning Requiring Corneal Transplant:
Reported incidence: 0.01%
Hale Vision Correction: 0% in 8600 cases

Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011 (Intralase period) 0% in 7900 cases
Corneal Perforation:
Certain keratome technology can allow the flap cut to penetrate the eye, often leading to very serious consequences. Most of this technology has been replaced.

Reported incidence: < 0.01%
Hale Vision Correction: 0% in 8600 cases
Hale Vision Center: 2003-2011 (Intralase period) 0% in 7900 cases

References:
(1) Montes M, Chayet A, Gomez L, Magallanes R, Robledo N. J Refract Surg. 1999: 15: 106-110.
(2) Steinert RF, McColgin AZ, White A, Horeburgh GM. Am J Ophthalmology. 2000; 129: 380-381.
(3) Yeoh J, Moshegov CN. Clin Experiment Ophthalmology. 2001; 29: 435-437.
(4) Chang-Godinich A, Steinert RF, Wu HK. Arch Ophthalmology. 2001; 119: 1074-1076.
(5) Ambrosio, R, Jr., Wislon SE. J Refract Surgery. 2001; 17: 350-79.
(6) Stulting RD, Carr JD, Thompson KP, Waring GO, Wiley WM, Walker JG. Ophthalomology. 1999; 106: 13-20.
(7) Kawesch GM, Kezerian GM. Ophthalmolgy. 2000; 107: 653-61.
(8) Tham VM, Maloney RK. Ophthalmology. 2000; 107: 920-924.
(9) Lin RT, Maloney RK. Am J Ophthalmology. 1999; 127: 129-136.
(10) Knorz, MC, Jendritza B, Hugger P, Liermann A. Ophthalmologe. 1999; 96: 503-508.
Please note: The above section summarizes many of the most common patient concerns. It does not, however, attempt to list every possible concern.
(262) 789-9179
BROOKFIELD, WI

Need More Information?

Fill out the form below and one of our staff members will promptly answer your questions:

Your Name:
First Name:
Last Name:
Phone:
Email:
Question:

Learn More

We feel it is very important for you to understand the different surgical techniques we use. You can learn more from our Video Library.

Milwaukee Lasik News

There was an error with the rss feed.

Reviews

I am so happy I found Dr Hale. After years of wearing contacts or glasses I am so pleased with the results of my intralase surgery. I was very comfor... Read More

Find Us on Facebook
Watch Us on Youtube
Follow us on Twitter

Other Contacts:

TLC Milwaukee/Hale Vision
20350 Watertower Blvd, Suite 200
Brookfield, WI 53045
Phone (262) 789-9179
langelroth@vgroupholdings.com

Hale Vision, Laser and Implant Center BBB Business Review
Find Us on Facebook
Watch Us on Youtube
Follow us on Twitter

Copyright 2017 • Hale Vision Laser and Implant Center • 20350 Watertower Blvd. #200 • Brookfield, WI 53045